Shae Bishop on Patterns & Cultural Identity

In one segment of the Sand Hill Artists Collective’s Virtual Holiday Gallery Tour, ceramic artist Shae Bishop talks about his detailed, colorful, and thought provoking work as part of the Penland Gallery webinar. This brief excerpt is a small fraction of the work and artists featured in the webinar series presented by SHAC this month. Tickets are available on our home page. Purchasers will receive access to recordings of all ten webinars after the series concludes.

Virtual Holiday Gallery Tour, Day 3 – by Louise Glickman

Michael Manes, director of Blue Spiral 1 Gallery, provided an insider’s look at the history and range of talents represented at this acclaimed gallery that has parented the Asheville art scene.

Virtual Holiday Gallery Tour Day 2 – by Louise Glickman

Day 2 of SHAC’s Virtual Holiday Gallery Tours told the story of culture and communities through the eyes and hands at Pink Dog Creative (PDC), its founders and artists. We were introduced to the vision of Randy Shull (Randy’s art at https://22london.org) and Hedy Fischer that PDC would form a community of artists while launching the expansion of creative businesses onto Depot Street. Their philanthropic endeavors dovetail with projects like In Solidarity where their artists and friends have done special works, sold online and at the gallery, raising over $7000 for justice & equity initiatives. http://www.pinkdog-creative.com/in-solidarity. Joseph Pearson gave us demos of delightful… Read More

Sand Hill Artists Collective’s First Year – by Louise Glickman

This time last year saw the start of the Biltmore Lake Artists group, which has expanded to become the Sand Hill Artists Collective. SHAC has grown rapidly in its mission to showcase artists living in the Biltmore Lake, Enka, Candler, and West Asheville area. SHAC begins its fund-raising Virtual Holiday Gallery Tour this week.

Now is the Best Time to Build our Creative Communities

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the meaning of Community in this age of Coronavirus. I spend fifty hours plus a week leading the Center for Craft, a national arts nonprofit centered here in Asheville.

Art and Community: Out of Isolation

By Louise Glickman Last fall, I mostly stopped driving due to eye issues, stalling me on constant forays downtown for meetings, lunches, and errands. That also placed me a bit ahead of the curve on using my time creatively while at home. With Covid 19, my friends and neighbors have joined me in mostly isolation and I’m happy to say, surrounded by my devices (laptop, iPhone and desktop), I’m happily connected and still have time for art in my studio.Anxious to meet neighbors who live in my neighborhood, I hoped to share… Read More